When You Were Young

Antidote Superalimentation will also be equipped with a fully stocked juice and smoothie bar, a cafe for fair trade coffee and tea, along with various ready-to-eat dishes.

I need this!

y do black people love big nasty butts so much
Anonymous

kingfin12:

headturnmeon:

thepoeticrebel:

onlyplutochow:

penutbutterqueen:

youngharlemnigga:

lyriciss:

b-itch-y:

saluteme-chanel:

strawberry-bounce:

Good gawd

How

Lawd.

And the black ones are nasty…
RIIIIGGGHHHTTT

How could you live with your booty so flat?

This post is so fucking sad, like how can you live your life like this?

All those tables.

Lmaoooo 😂😂😂 WELP!

😂😂 please call 911 I’m dieing.

Hahaha brown ass pride

Just drawing stuff with the kids. #iceking #adventuretime

Just drawing stuff with the kids. #iceking #adventuretime

sandwichdegato:

scienceyoucanlove:

Surgeons performed a C-section on this turtle and saved her life!A turtle named Dabao was a bit lethargic and zookeepers at China’s Chengu City Zoo thought she was sick and sent her for x-rays. The results were surprising: 14 eggs were stuck in the birth canal. To make sure Dabao survived, the surgeons opened the shell with a skull opener, carefully removed the 14 eggs (which were immediately buried in sand to await hatching) and resealed the shell with epoxy resin.Read more: http://bit.ly/1j2zcqQ via Digital JournalImage via Scientific Illustration for the Research Scientist | somersault18:24
source

yay


Amazinnnnng

sandwichdegato:

scienceyoucanlove:

Surgeons performed a C-section on this turtle and saved her life!

A turtle named Dabao was a bit lethargic and zookeepers at China’s Chengu City Zoo thought she was sick and sent her for x-rays. The results were surprising: 14 eggs were stuck in the birth canal. To make sure Dabao survived, the surgeons opened the shell with a skull opener, carefully removed the 14 eggs (which were immediately buried in sand to await hatching) and resealed the shell with epoxy resin.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1j2zcqQ via Digital Journal

Image via Scientific Illustration for the Research Scientist | somersault18:24

source

yay

Amazinnnnng

Take me baccccck

Take me baccccck

Lmfao

Lmfao

He’s thinking “The fuck is wrong with this hoe. “

notyourstandardops:

fuckyou-fuckme-fuckit:

disneygirlxx:

martin-munster:

munchflower:

When my daughter first showed signs of hating herself, I got out photoshop. We went and found an image of her choosing, of a woman. I spent the next two hours showing her just how easy it was to alter this woman. I changed her hair, whitened her teeth, made her thinner. I erased her blemishes and even made her taller while my daughter sat there aghast. At the end of it she loudly said - ” THAT’S NOT FAIR!” 

I told her that damn near every image she saw of people in magazines, on television, etc, was altered like this, and that she should never compare herself to that, because even supermodels don’t look like supermodels. 

I wish I could do that for every child. I wish it was a mandatory class in school.

image

I AM SHOWING THIS TO EVERYONE 

I SAW THIS IN CLASS BEFORE. THE TEACHER WAS ALL LIKE ”please, never compare yourself to people you see in magazines. They’re always altered. It’s as easy as that.” I ALMOST STOOD UP AND YELLED ”AMEN, MISS. AMEN.”

France want’s to put a health warning on images like these

havocados:

nprglobalhealth:

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick
Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.
The technologies exist for doing that, but there’s a problem: cost.
Now MIT’s Rohit Karnik thinks he’s on to a much less expensive way to clean up water: Use the xylem of a plant.
Now if you remember your high school biology, you’ll know that xylem is the stuff in plants that transports water in the form of sap from the roots to the leaves.
"And the way the water is moved is by evaporation from the leaves," says Karnik.
It’s somewhat like what happens when you put a straw into a glass of liquid. Evaporation from the leaves has the same effect as sucking on the straw.
Pulling water up to the leaves this way creates a problem for the plant, but also an opportunity for an inventor.
The plant’s problem is something called cavitation, or the growth of air bubbles, which makes it harder for water to reach the leaves. But Karnik says xylem has a way of getting rid of these bubbles.
"The xylem has membranes with pores and other mechanisms by which bubbles are prevented from easily spreading and flowing in the xylem tissue," he says.
And it turns out these same pores that are so good at filtering out air bubbles are just the right size for filtering out nasty bacteria.
To prove it worked, he created a simple setup in his lab. He peeled the bark off a pine branch and took the sapwood underneath containing the xylem into a tube. He then sent a stream of water containing tiny particles through the tube and showed that the wood filter removed them.
"We also flowed in bacteria and showed we could filter out bacteria using the xylem," he says. Karnik estimates the xylem removed 99.9 percent of the bacteria.





The results were published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.
Continue reading.
Image: Making a xylem water filter is easy: Just peel back the bark and stick inside a tube. (PLOS ONE)


damn it’s like nature is way more bad ass than we give credit for.great find on their part but something tells me this shit is old, old news.

Sweeeet

havocados:

nprglobalhealth:

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.

The technologies exist for doing that, but there’s a problem: cost.

Now MIT’s Rohit Karnik thinks he’s on to a much less expensive way to clean up water: Use the xylem of a plant.

Now if you remember your high school biology, you’ll know that xylem is the stuff in plants that transports water in the form of sap from the roots to the leaves.

"And the way the water is moved is by evaporation from the leaves," says Karnik.

It’s somewhat like what happens when you put a straw into a glass of liquid. Evaporation from the leaves has the same effect as sucking on the straw.

Pulling water up to the leaves this way creates a problem for the plant, but also an opportunity for an inventor.

The plant’s problem is something called cavitation, or the growth of air bubbles, which makes it harder for water to reach the leaves. But Karnik says xylem has a way of getting rid of these bubbles.

"The xylem has membranes with pores and other mechanisms by which bubbles are prevented from easily spreading and flowing in the xylem tissue," he says.

And it turns out these same pores that are so good at filtering out air bubbles are just the right size for filtering out nasty bacteria.

To prove it worked, he created a simple setup in his lab. He peeled the bark off a pine branch and took the sapwood underneath containing the xylem into a tube. He then sent a stream of water containing tiny particles through the tube and showed that the wood filter removed them.

"We also flowed in bacteria and showed we could filter out bacteria using the xylem," he says. Karnik estimates the xylem removed 99.9 percent of the bacteria.

The results were published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

Continue reading.

Image: Making a xylem water filter is easy: Just peel back the bark and stick inside a tube. (PLOS ONE)

damn it’s like nature is way more bad ass than we give credit for.

great find on their part but something tells me this shit is old, old news.

Sweeeet